Wood Type Museum Urgently Seeks Donations

Rating: 
Body: 

The Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum, which hosts the largest collection of wood type in the U.S., is being forced to move from its current location in Two Rivers, Wisconsin and is urgently seeking donations to fund the move. The museum, which is dedicated to the preservation, study, production and printing of wood type has to find a new home by February 2013. So far, over $80,000 has been raised towards a goal of $250,000.

The museum is a treasure trove of typographic history. Its collection includes 1.5 million pieces of wood type, advertising cuts from the 1930s to the 1970s, and all of the tools and equipment used in making and printing with wood type.

In the press release about the upcoming move, the museum's director Jim Moran states, “We are definitely moving and will be staying in Two Rivers. Unfortunately, the hopes of staying in the Hamilton building are not an option. It will be an important break in continuity for Hamilton as a manufacturer going back to 1880. However, this is an opportunity to find a location where we can better protect, preserve, organize and demonstrate this enormous and valuable collection.”

Contributions may be made online at http://www.woodtype.org/support.

To learn more about Hamilton and the history of wood type from the people who made it with their own hands, check out this video:

Liked This? Read These!

Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum, keepers of the premier collection of wood type in America, needs funds to continue in a new location. Read More
It's another Kickstarter success story. In the spring of 2011, Matt Braun & Matt Griffin, graphic designers and letterpress printers, went on the micro-funding site looking for backers. Their... Read More
Press Release P22 Preissig Scrape was digitized in 1997 from samples of an alphabet designed and hand cut by Vojtech Preissig in 1914 for a book project that was never completed. The book... Read More
I don't know what's in the water in Buffalo, New York, but they sure do know their old-school type and printing there. Case in point: P22 Type Foundry, source for many historically inspired typefaces... Read More