Sandee Cohen

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Sandee Cohen is a New York City-based instructor and corporate trainer in a wide variety of graphic programs, especially the Adobe products, including InDesign, Illustrator, Photoshop, and Acrobat. She has been an instructor for New School University, Cooper Union, Pratt, and School of Visual Arts. She is a frequent speaker for various events. She has also been a speaker for Seybold Seminars, Macworld Expo, and PhotoPlus conferences. She is the author of many versions of the Visual Quickstart Guides for InDesign.
  • Features: Written by Sandee Cohen on May 16, 2014
    Adobe's consistent approach makes it easier to learn how to use the Pen tool.
  • Features: Written by Sandee Cohen on March 10, 2014
    Here’s how to take full advantage of each application’s interface features, including color themes, tools, panels, and more.
  • Features: Written by Sandee Cohen on January 24, 2014
    Sandee Cohen (aka Vectorbabe) shows how to move vectors between InDesign, Illustrator, and Photoshop and why they sometimes turn into pixels.
  • Features: Written by Sandee Cohen on December 6, 2013
    How to combine InDesign, Illustrator, and Photoshop into one super-application.
  • Features: Written by Sandee Cohen on October 21, 2013
    How to combine InDesign, Illustrator, and Photoshop into one super-application.
  • Features: Written by Sandee Cohen on January 26, 2012
    For many years, I made the tables of contents for my books manually. I would finish the book and then, one by one, I would open the file for each chapter and write down the name of the chapter, the name of the A Heads, and the page numbers for each. It averaged 200 entries for each book's table of contents (TOC). It was a tedious process, but manageable.
  • Features: Written by Sandee Cohen on December 28, 2011
    As you drag to create or move objects on an InDesign page, you may have noticed lines, arrows, and other indicators appearing and disappearing. These are Smart Guides and other elements that can help you work more precisely. If you haven’t yet used Smart Guides, the following tips will introduce you to easy alignment and spacing that will result in better-looking pages. Smart Guides for the Page and Column Centers
  • Features: Written by Sandee Cohen on November 16, 2011
    Many people who use InDesign can't precisely define the word “glyph.” While we may be more confortable with imagery than with words, it's still good to understand the term and, most importantly, know how to use InDesign's Glyphs panel. Put simply, a glyph is the graphic representation of a character. Several glyphs can look very different but represent the same character. Take the example below. While all four letters represent the same character, the lowercase e, they each have a unique glyph shape.
  • Features: Written by Sandee Cohen on October 17, 2011
    Billions of years ago, when dinosaurs ruled the earth, print production managers checked documents with something called "progressive proofs" or "color proofs". These printed pieces of paper showed how each process color (cyan, magenta, yellow, and black) would print alone and in combination with the other colors. They were output as follows: • The magenta plate alone • The yellow plate alone • A mixture of the yellow plate combined with the magenta plate • The cyan plate alone • A mixture of the cyan plate with the yellow and magenta plates
  • Features: Written by Sandee Cohen on August 18, 2011
    Everyone knows the healthy habits we should practice regularly, like flossing our teeth, cleaning the litter box, and recycling bottles and cans. But too often, we're in a rush and skip the routine. Similarly, there are healthy habits for working in InDesign that can make your life much easier. If you don't practice these software habits, your teeth won't fall out, the cat won't attack you, and the recycle police won't arrest you, but you will deprive yourself of some of InDesign's power.

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