Gene Gable

Gene Gable's picture
Gene Gable has spent a lifetime in publishing, editing and the graphic arts and is currently a technology consultant and writer. After a decade in commercial typesetting and design services, he chronicled the desktop-publishing revolution from his post as publisher and president of Publish magazine. With nine international editions, Publish became the leading global resource on the use of digital technology for print and Web production. Gable served on the operational boards of International Data Group's PCWorld, The Web and PC Games magazines and was earlier publisher of Sporting Times magazine. During his tenure at Ziff-Davis Gable was on the executive team responsible for major business events such as Comdex, Networld+Interop and JavaOne. As president of Seybold Seminars and publisher of The Seybold Report, Gable managed a global slate of conferences, trade shows and other graphic-arts educational products. During his leadership Seybold events featured prominent speakers such as Arthur Sulzberger Jr., publisher of the New York Times, Steve Jobs, CEO of Apple Computer, Christie Hefner, president of Playboy Enterprises, Bruce Chizen, CEO of Adobe Systems, and Daniel Carp, CEO of Eastman Kodak. Gable has spoken at events around the world and has written extensively on graphic design, intellectual-property rights, and publishing production in books and for magazines such as Print, U&lc, ID, Macworld, Graphic Exchange, AGI, and The Seybold Report. His clients have included A-list brands in technology and financial services. Gable's interest in graphic design history and letterpress printing resulted in his popular columns "Heavy Metal Madness" and "Scanning Around with Gene" here on CreativePro.com. Follow Gene on Twitter: https://twitter.com/SAWG
  • Features: Written by Gene Gable on July 2, 2007
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    I suspect every American kid, especially every boy, has vivid memories of Fourth of July fireworks and can, at the mere mention of sparklers, pinwh

  • Features: Written by Gene Gable on May 16, 2007

    The term "clip art" has become a generic description of any art, illustration, photograph, or other visual material that is sold as copyright- or royalty-free, usually in collections, and almost always without specific attribution to the creating artist. But technically "clip art" is an era-specific term, coined at a time when these illustrations were actually "clipped" or cut out of books for use in paste-up or photographed for print mechanicals.

  • Features: Written by Gene Gable on April 6, 2007

    Despite the fact that nearly one third of the world will not eat pork for religious reasons, and many (like myself) choose not to for other reasons (like because pigs are so cute), the most-popular dish on Easter tables this year will undoubtedly be ham. Ham and Easter have gone together for a long time -- some say back to Pagan rituals before there was an Easter. Pigs bring good luck, it is said, so to assure a productive spring we slaughter and eat them.

  • Features: Written by Gene Gable on February 12, 2007
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    When I was growing up in Southern California, I knew at a pretty early age what it meant to be an adult.

  • Features: Written by Gene Gable on January 12, 2007

    At Macworld Expo on January 9, Steve Jobs unveiled the iPhone, which combines a phone, widescreen iPod, and Internet device in one slim package (Figure 1).

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    Figure 1. The new iPhone is 4.5 inches tall, 2.4 inches wide, and 0.46 inches thick.

  • Features: Written by Gene Gable on December 22, 2006

    Christmas morning brings a variety of emotions and memories, but one memory that seems almost universal is that time when Santa (or the equivalent gift-giving religious/spiritual icon) delivered a shiny new bike. Bicycles are right up there with Bing Crosby records and hand-me-down cookie recipes when it comes to holiday schmaltz and tradition.

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  • Features: Written by Gene Gable on October 20, 2006

    Before Hollywood brats got "Punk'd," and before political opponents hacked each other's Web sites, the art of the practical joke was a bit simpler. You might be offered a stick of gum, only to have your finger snapped, or maybe you would freshen up at a neighbor's house and exit the bathroom in black face, the victim of novelty soap. Or, if you were particularly vulnerable, you could count on something exploding in your face or sparking a sneezing fit.

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  • Features: Written by Gene Gable on September 4, 2006
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    The New York Times recently ran an article called "

  • Features: Written by Gene Gable on July 14, 2006
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    Editor's Note: We recognize that some of you will feel strongly about this article.

  • Features: Written by Gene Gable on June 7, 2006

    Aside from my sister and me, the possession my mother has held on to the longest is a massive monaural Packard Bell console record player/radio and the four record albums that have been in it for close to 50 years. This isn't because of a fondness for music, but because this piece of furniture makes a great place to put the mail. I'm guessing you could fit several thousand iPods in the same space, but they can't hold the latest issues of Reader's Digest or National Geographic.

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